When divorced parents live in different states?

When divorced parents live in different states?

When parents live far apart, a common arrangement is for the child to remain in one state for the school year and live with the other parent during the summer. While joint custody is possible when parents live in different states, judges are unlikely to order joint physical custody because it’s not always feasible.

Can a divorced parent with joint custody move out of state?

These “move-away cases” are among the most difficult types of custody disputes. Typically, a parent can’t move a child to another county or state without prior approval from the court that issued the original custody order. A judge could even change custody arrangements in favor of the noncustodial parent.

Is it possible to co parent in different states?

So how do you co-parent when your ex lives hours or states away from you? Regardless of whether you’re the parent relocating or the parent who is left behind, know that it is possible to successfully co-parent in a long-distance situation to the benefit of your kids.

Can a ex wife move the children out of State?

This rule also includes that they cannot move the children out of state. In my state, in order to move the children to a different state, your ex wife would have to file a motion. She would need the court’s permission to move the children.

What happens when parents live in different states?

Modifying Custody When Parents Live in Different States. Once the child’s home state issues a custody order, that state keeps jurisdiction over the case. For example, if a child lives in Texas with one parent and the other parent lives in Mississippi, only the Texas court can make changes to the custody order.

Can a divorced woman file for custody of a child in another state?

An issue of jurisdiction may arise if you and your child have moved to a different state, but your ex-husband remains in the state where the child was born and where you were divorced.

What happens if one parent lives in Mississippi and one lives in Texas?

Once the child’s home state issues a custody order, that state keeps jurisdiction over the case. For example, if a child lives in Texas with one parent and the other parent lives in Mississippi, only the Texas court can make changes to the custody order.

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